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us this gregory of the center for democracy and technology. what is the current law when it comes to law enforcement and e- mails and cell phones? >> the short answer is that it is confused. for e-mail that is less than 180 days old, law makers need a warrant. for more than 180 days, it is just a subpoenas of there is no judicial intervention or high standard of proof. for documents to store in the clouds, that is also available with a subpoena. with cell phones there is the statutory provision. this has been in different places. they need a warrant. others say if it is gps location they need a warrant. there is not a clear role. >> what are the changes that the senate judiciary committee has approved? >> they focused on content of communications. they said it should not matter how old the content is. it should matter how you started with a service provider or that one. they said there should be a warrant required. they maintain the existing exceptions to the requirement in current law. if there is this, they are able to get a voluntary disclosure from the provider right away. >>
? i would argue east of these questions carried fairly profound rule of law implications. as xi jinping rises to take the top position in china and wrestles with new challenges and attempts to answer any questions, i would argue that many of them are based in basic rule of law doctorate -- doctrine. the most important steps ahead for china will be around bolstering the rule of law. the implications are profound for expanding civil society, for human rights, for addressing the needs of ordinary citizens, for building a greater economic certainty. rule of law is an essential pillar of our democracy. for china, rule of law is the best way of regulating and settling disputes in society. serving as a check against the abuse of power. the real question for china over the next few years will be, what reigns supreme for the world's second largest economy -- the party or the law? despite setbacks in recent years, wen jiabao said, rule of law will be one of three components of any future democracy along with dignity, justice, and independence as guarantees in any reform efforts. number 2,
. smith: mr. speaker, h.r. 6620, the former presidents protection act of 2012, amends federal law to uniformerly provide lifetime secret service protection to all of america's former presidents. i want to thank the gentleman from south carolina, mr. gowdy, and the gentleman from virginia, mr. scott, for sponsoring this commonsense bipartisan legislation. america has a responsibility to protect its presidents and its families and not simply while they serve in office. we also have a duty to ensure the ongoing safety of those who serve in america's highest elected office after they leave office. in 1958 congress first authorized secret service protection for former presidents, which was limited to a reasonable period of time after a president leaves office. congress expanded this to lifetime protection in 1965. but in 1994, congress once again limited secret service protection for former presidents. this time to 10 years after a president leaves office. this 10-year restriction applied to presidents who took office after january 1, 1997. the role of the former president has changed
, the health care law may face in the coming days and in the coming years with julie rovner of n.p.r., and we'll be right back. >> program under began under tugwell who was one of the advisers to president franklin roosevelt. to document the conditions under which people were living, this was back when we didn't have television. we had radio, but a lot of places didn't have electricity so they couldn't listen to the radio broadcast to find out what was going on in parts of the country. royce striker, who was an economist from columbia university, he was the head of this project, and in 1939 when kodak introduced color film, they sent film to roy striker to have his photographers try out, to see what they could do. kodak was trying to establish a new market, a new product and they wanted people who would know how to use it effectively to try it out and publicize it. >> america of the 1930's and 40's comes to life through the eye of the camera as they share some of the 1,600 color photographs taken during the depression and world war ii. sundays at 7:00 p.m. and 10:00 p.m. eastern. part of amer
on the bill they just debated, changing federal energy efficiency laws. we'll take you live next to the capital, the chair and co-chair of the democratic caucus, just starting a briefing talking about the fiscal cliff and jobs. it's live here on c-span. >> and continues to preach the kind of message that i think the nation needs, one of compromise but one of assurity that we are going to be looking out tore the interest of the middle class and the protection of social security, medicare and medicaid for the people who are in such desperate need of those great programs that are the hallmark of our country. we have repeatedly said and our caucus again just confirmed that job creation equals deficit reduction, and we must put the country back to work. we have proposals that are on the floor. we still believe that even with the -- what little time remains and what little time remains when we're actually working, this is still possible. this is still doable. this is not a democrat or republican issue. republicans believe that america needs to go back to work. it's just a matter of hav
of employees he has to less than 50 so he won't be subject to penalties under the 2010 health law. so right now the federal government is keeping him from offering jobs. that hurts the people who need jobs and who would be happy to be on a payroll where they would be putting their own contributions into social security and medicare. increasing taxes means less growth and fewer jobs, and that's not balanced. three years ago i made a pledge to oppose tax increases. i made that pledge to the citizens i serve and to no one else, and i made it because tax increases will hurt them. when jen, the owner of la petite cuisine in new york says the best thing i can do is give her a break from high taxes, i believe her. i ran for congress to help jen and all the small business people like her who are the engines of job creation. i ran for congress to help all the people who need employers like jen to hire them. these good people deserve better than temporary fixes. they deserve a plan that solves our economic problems for the long term. they deserve a plan that goes beyond politics and shows a commitment to
about my pal. when he came into the senate, i had heard of him. my law partner, bob ranck, was a heavyweight champion from wisconsin university. i said this guy was the light heavyweight champion from syracuse, which he was. anyway, he came in and i said, remember bob? heavyweight champion from wisconsin when you were on the team in syracuse? he said, what a left hook. that is what he said. he could knock people out with that thing. people thought he was right- handed and then he would plow them with that. many news in and outside of the senate. public interest groups and campaign reform -- it was always about friendship and trust. trust is what is missing in this place. the point of trust is the coin of the realm, and the point of trust is severely tarnished. it is easy to see and it is very sad to those of us who are here. he was a remarkable kind of a guy. loved to to fight, especially -- remember those puffing noises he used to make? [laughter] it was usually after a cigarette he had snatched out in the hall. still smoking those things? he said, shut up. then he would
-- a u.s. senator. a law degree from the university of wyoming -- he was elected to the legislature in 1964 and the u.s. senate in 1978 where he served three terms and was elected as majority leader. leaving the senate, he has been director of the institute of politics at harvard and has practiced law. he is the author of the book "right in the old gazoo -- a lifetime of scrapping with the press." the breakfast is being underwritten by areva, a growing player in renewable energy and nuclear energy. we thank them for their support. as always, we are on the record here. please no live blogging or other means of filing -- to give you some time to think. there is no embargo, but c-span has agreed not to air the video of the breakfast until noon today to give those of you who actually paid to attend the breakfast time to file. finally, if you'd like to ask a question please do the traditional thing and send me a subtle, nonthreatening signal. with that, thanks again from our supporters and viewers. >> he always goes first. the times article was right about one thing -- the debt duo, if y
requirements. under current law, financial institutions are required to provide annual privacy is notices that the explain their practices. they are required to mail those notices regardless of whether or not that information sharing practice has changed. these annual mailings cost millions each year and do not provide the consumers with new information if the practice hasn't change thsmed will require an institution to provide annual privacy notices only if they have changed their privacy rules. this will eliminate an unnecessary burden for our financial institutions. i would like to thank mr. luetkemeyer and mr. sherman for their leadership on this issue and reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. sherman: i thank the gentlelady from west virginia for yielding to me and i yield myself such time as i may consume in support of h.r. 5817, the eliminate privacy notify -- notice confusion act. i want to thank representative luetkemeyer for his work in introducing this bill. i've enjoyed working with him on it. mr. -- ms. speak
the gramm-rudman deficit law, which was so important at the time. those issues remain important today. he did not aspire to be a politician, and he did not have to like one. he cared deeply. [laughter] we know he cared deeply about our country and devoted himself because he had a calling to shape and preserve our country's future. he believed deeply in the rule of law and used the force of his intellect to defend it. one of the things that is most telling about warren rudman is the statement that represents what he was all about. he once said -- i consider myself an american first and a republican second. fiercely independent, and totally committed to the common good, he had the courage of his convictions and stood for what he believed in. in bidding farewell to the senate in 1992, he expressed gratitude for the opportunity to serve in the senate with talented colleagues. many are here today to speak about their experiences with him. he also expressed his hope for the future of the senate, saying it is a very special place with very special people. i hope in the coming years that the inst
in the courthouse when d.n.a. started coming into be used at the courthouse. prior to that many law enforcement and prosecutors had to rely on blood samples and fingerprints, but once d.n.a. came in and we learned everybody has a unique genetic makeup and it can be connected and traced to perpetrators of crime when they commit a crime, especially in sexual assault cases. and convictions have gone up. the evidence is better. the proof beyond a reasonable doubt is much more available in d.n.a. cases. in 1985, there was a 13-year-old girl named lavenia masters. she lived in dallas, texas. she told her folks good night. she went to her bedroom which should be, mr. speaker, the safest place on earth for children -- went to sleep and during the middle of the night she was woken up by an outlaw putting a knife to her throat and he sexually assaulted her. then he snuck away in the darkness of the night. that was in 1985. she went to the hospital. her parents took care of her medical needs. d.n.a. evidence was taken from her. it was given to the law enforcement authorities, but that d.n.a. evidence from
, mich. on the line for democrats. caller: i think they need to pass a law that these guys did not get paid. if i go to work and did not do my job, they will not pay me. they have not done their jobs in the years. they need to listen to the american people. we picked barack obama up for a reason because we like his policies. they need to get a clue. they are already struggling and having a hard time. if they do not get a clue, they will not be back there. host: republicans say the president and democrats are not making any good-faith offers, the same thing democrats say about republicans. how do we get them to move past with the speaker is calling a stalemate? caller: the people need to look at their actions, not what people are saying. these obstructionists' have locked down congress for years now. they are just continuing to do it. they refuse to admit to obama has a mandate to tax these rich people. just the other day the corporate income is up to 1175 trillion dollars. these corporations are sitting on this money. they sat on it all through the election to make obama look bad. i kn
to take these young women when they are interacting with law enforcement because a lot of them find themselves into prostitution and get treated like perpetrators as opposed to victims. this is the psychology of a perpetrator but they are victims and we have to get law enforcement and our judicial system to treat these women as victims and put them in a setting to pull themselves away from drug addition. >> in a minute, politico is -- politico is going to ask you some questions. one of the questions that has come in, who is the best leader in washington, d.c.? >> robert griffin, iii. >> why did the majority of americans reject the republican party in the recent election? >> it was an election and it was a very close election. if you look at the nims and the differences between the two. i think the republican party can do a better job of limited government and freep enterprise movement and connect those policies. >> why has there been a failure to connect? >> i'm not sure there is one reason for it and i haven't had time to think about it why it has happened but it needs to happen. t
, many of them have american children. yet without any way, currently, of getting right with the law. what we need to do in immigration reform is require that people who are here illegally get right with the law rather than prevent them from getting right with the law. which is what we do currently. so again, while stem immigration is very important, my colleagues are being asked in a closed proto sess to weigh that with the issue of immigrants from the ukraine and albania, at the same time the bill could increase, will increase, the number of illegal immigrants in this country, perhaps increasing the number of illegal immigrants will redouble the efforts of this congress to address this issue but given the enormous dwention of the problem already and the complete lack of consideration of any meaningful immigration bill by this congress to solve our broken immigration system, inle not holding my breath. the zero sum bill on the floor asks us to weight one class of immigrants at the expense of another. in effect, trying to play politics and avoid solving our imdepration crisis. -- and
in the u.s. senate to pass important legislation, including the grand rudman deficit law. those issues remain important today. he did not aspire to be a politician. he did not have to like one. he cared deeply. we know he cared deeply about our country and devoted himself because he had a calling to shape and preserve our country's future. he believed deeply in the rule of law and used the force of his intellect to defend it. one of the things that is most telling about warren rudman is the statement that represents what he was all about. he once said -- i consider myself an american first and a republican second, fiercely independent, and totally committed to the common good. he had the carriage of his convictions and stood for what he believed in. in bidding farewell to to the senate in 1992, he expressed gratitude for the opportunity to serve in the senate which talented colleagues. many are here today to speak about their experiences with him. he expressed his hopes for the future of the senate, saying it is a special place with special people. i hope in the coming years that the i
said in a law that they would pay that money back in a trust fund. but there is suspicion on whether that is rarely ever going to happen. that feeds into their concern about what will happen to social security. is it going to be changed in ways that affect the benefits? host: all of the calls to simplify the tax code, to streamline it, and that may certainly mean to itemize the credits of that take place on the tax returns. guest: the complexity of the tax system is a huge problem. everyone from the irs on down to congress and the industry out there, if you will, the financial accounting industry, everyone recognizes is an enormous problem and causes people to pay a lot more than they otherwise would. most people do not do their own taxes anymore because they are so complex. they rely on software that is kind of a black box. it is hard to know how the tax system works anymore. people do not have as much of an incentive to take a deduction if they do not know it is there. and the software is what they are depending on. host: does simplifying the tax code as necessarily mean lessening
through college and law school. these loans make a big difference, whether it is pell grants or loans. let me look at this honestly. 25% of the federal aid education goes to for-profit schools. they have more than double the student loan default rate than any other. there are ways to cut back on spending and education that will give us opportunities and resources for real education, which can be part of our future. when it comes to the most painful topic of all. i came here in 1983 and was told social security would be on its way out. we rolled up with our sleeves and came up with a bipartisan solution that ultimately bought over 50 years of solvency for social security. we raised the retirement age, payable taxes on social security, and we taxed those social security benefits indirectly for the first time. today, social security will make every promised payment for the next 22 years. you cannot say that about much in washington. social security has not added one penny to the deficit. for those who say there is good reason to push it off the table and wait, i would add a note of caution. s
nato is through continued development of democracy and the rule of law. there have been increasing pressure on the president to resign prior to the constitutional end of his term in october of 2013. while the new majority may see this as a logical next step to finalizing the transfer of power, attempting to have them give up their position -- the prosecutor's office arrested three officers of the government charged with unspecified abuses of power. georgia's made enormous power over the past two months. progress which very few predicted would require. thank you, mr. speaker. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from vermont seek recognition? mr. welch: to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from vermont is recognized for one minute. mr. welch: i thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, it's been 141 days, that's how long it's been since the house agriculture committee on a bipartisan basis passed the farm bill by a vote of 35-1. that's th
is this was the first step forward in terms of trying to address the need for modernization in our visa laws. and we have a system of lottery that, frankly, i think, is properly replaced with a system that rewards those who want to come here to help create jobs and help get our economy back on track. so it's very much, i think, in sync with our priority of helping americans get back to work, helping create more jobs for more americans. >> democrats have now said after your response towards the thee house's proposal that ball is now in your court, that the onus is on you to put forth a proposal. is the ball in the republicans' court now? >> well, we remain committed at all -- at all instances to engage in discussions that are serious. i think that the proposal that was delivered here by secretary geithner to the speaker and me yesterday was not a serious proposal. we remain in discussions. i know the speaker as well as i do not want to see us go over the fiscal cliff, but feel very strongly we've got to get serious here. we don't want to increase tax rates. we're not going to increase tax rates. and
to change the law. it is a difficult political situation we have. only one government in our history since 1948 has fulfilled a legal term. it was the gold my air -- golda meierboal th government, thanks to the yom kippur wall. our decision in this election to move forward as one big party was the first up towards this political reform. it is impossible to only preach and teach to others. you must give yourself some example of what you're willing to do. it was a small party that started as a liberal party. step after step, they took the power. for real political forms, we need political blocs, and i hope to see it the next knesset this new reality, presidential elections, four or five big parties. >> first of all, thank you again for joining us. i do not think if you ran research in the streets of tel aviv or washington you would find a lot of people who know who rousseau and voltaire are. if we want to wait until the palestinians know who they are, it is going to be a while. so let's put that aside for a second. the $10,000bout gdp. i think it is a lofty idea and a very good idea. let's a
, congress can pass a law that would prevent a tax hike, the first $250,000 of everybody's income. everybody -- that means that 98% of america and 97% of small businesses would not see their taxes go up by a single dime. 98% of americans, a 97% of small businesses would not see their income taxes increased. even the wealthiest americans would still get a tax cut, the first $250,000 of their income. it is not like folks who make more than that are not getting a tax break -- they are getting a tax break on the first $250,000 like everybody else. families and small businesses will be able to enjoy some peace of mind heading into christmas and the new year. it will give us more time next year to work together on a comprehensive plan to bring down our deficits, streamline our tax system, and do it in a balanced way. including asking the wealthiest americans to pay a little more so we can still invest in things like education and training in science and research. i know some of this may sound familiar to you. we talked a lot about this during the campaign. this should not be a surprise to anybody.
:30 a.m. >> washbourne went to harvard law school. he emigrated out west to illinois where the lead mine industry was in its heyday. he arrived after a month's journey by ship, by stagecoach, by train, and arrived in this muddy mining town, boarded himself in a log cabin, established a look -- law practice. he worked his way up and became a successful lawyer. he got involved politically, ran for congress. served for eight terms. he befriended abraham lincoln and you sillies s. gragrant. washbourne was a close confidante. after grant was elected president, he appointed washbou rne secretary of state. washbourne became ill. his family felt for his life -- there for his life. he submitted his resignation. grant accepted his resignation. over the next couple of months, he regained his health, which was always fragile. grant offered him the position as minister of france and ambassador. >> michael hill, elihu washbourne. the only diplomat from a major power to stay during the siege of paris. son and 9:00. >> first lady mr. obama welcome to military families to the white house for this season'
the manufacturing company at noon eastern an c-span2 3. >> worked his way up, went to harvard law school and then immigrated out west to illinois where the lead mine industry was in its hey day. he arrived after about a month's journey by shi ship, by stagecoach, by train and arrived on this steam boat in this muddy mining town boarded himself in a log cabin, established a law practice in a log cabin and worked his way up and became a successful lawyer. and got involved politically and ran for congress eight terms. and then befriended abraham lincoln from illinois. and then grant. and as they were on the rice, wash burn stayed with them as a close colleague during the civil war. and after grant was elected president he initially appointed him secretary of state. and at that time he became very ill. so after about ten days, he submitted his resignation to president grant and so he accepted his resignation. so over the next several months he refained his health which was always very fradge jill. so grant then offered him the position as interior -- ambassador to france. >> providing politi
-- autism spectrum, often the emphasis is specific on children and adults are not considered in state laws or federal research efforts. all the statistics you heard earlier focused on a 8-year-old. we do not look at the p population beyond that. i also think you cannot underestimate the role of poverty in this. to me, a disabled person has to choose essentially between access and no support or going on the ssi program, which places extremely draconian limits on the income you can earn and what you can save. people on sii cannot save more than $2,000 in assets. until we address these systemic -- the systemic poverty that forces people with disabilities, including autistic people and our families, to be held behind economically, we will not be able to address the disparities in the autism world. >> all of those who have come -- please note that there are some individuals in public office who share much of the hope and much of the concern and much of the anxiety that you have expressed. i thank you, mr. chairman, and yield back the balance of my time. >> thank you, mr. davis. the chairman rec
of the appropriations and budget committee. also joined by georgetown university tax law professor john buckley on how the alternative minimum tax is affecting fiscal negotiations. "washington journal" is next. ♪ ♪ host: 25 days to go before the united states faces the fiscal cliff, the white house has rejected a proposal from house republicans to prevent tax hikes and spending cuts at the end of the year. no formal talks between the two sides are scheduled today. will go outside the nation's capital to get your voice involved. republicans -- democrats -- independents -- send us a tweet, post your comments on facebook, or send us an e-mail. we begin with some of the papers across the country today and how this latest proposal from house republicans is playing out in the papers. courtesy of "the atlantic journal-constitution" -- here is "the denver post" -- finally, here is "of the arizona republic" -- here is "the washington post" on what is inside this deal -- we want to get your take on this. what do you think? ted in new york, a democratic caller. what do you think? caller: good morning. i do n
, dividends. current laws, they go back up. dividends treated as ordinary income. capital gains goes back up to 20%. how much revenue are we talking about? if those become bargaining chips, how much are we giving up? >> under current law, the capital gains rate is scheduled to go to 20%. we are actually talking 23.8%. dividends are scheduled to go to ordinary rates. you need the 3.8% for people who have higher incomes. significant increases in both are scheduled. as you think about the fiscal cliff and what is coming, one of the few places you can see people responding to it is in their behavior around capital gains and dividends. companies are moving up to how, shareholders take a vintage of a lower rate. i expect you will see more investors realize lower capital gains in order to get lower rates. there is clearly money there. there is clearly money that has interesting, distributional characteristics. as you think about the political process trying to structure when a package with a revenue goal and a distribution goal, my prediction is you will see at least some of those increases occur.
that if it could not pass that two-part test, then it should not become a law in the united states of america. he passed a comprehensive energy plan off the floor of this house. protected social security, advanced so many other issues. a in my opinion, tip o'neill was the elder -- was the albert einstein of politics. he knew what it took in order to make this institution work. he knew what it took to reach across the aisle, to find people of good will, to make this chamber work and to advance the agenda for this country. so for for me, it's a great honor to be here because buildings, as we name them, also embody that person. it is my hope that as people walk in and out of this building for the 21st century, that they think about who tip o'neill was. they think about, yes, how much he loved political war, but at the same time he brought his own personal warmth to that, that it was not separated here on the house floor. it is my hope in naming this building perhaps this process this great institution, can be an nated by his great legacy and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempo
. right now congress can pass a law that would prevent a tax hike on the first $250,000 of everybody's income. everybody. so that means 98% of americans, 97% of small businesses wouldn't see their income taxes go up by a single dime, right? because 98% of americans make $250,000 a year or less. 97% of small businesses make $250,000 a year or less. so if you say income taxes don't go up, income above $250,000, the vast majority of americans, they don't see a tax hike. but here's the thing, even the top 2%, even folks who make more than $250,000, they still keep their tax cut on the first $250,000 of income. so it would still be better off for them, too, for us to go ahead and get that done. families would have a sense of security going into the new year. companies like this one would know what to expect in terms of planning for next year and the year after. that means people's jobs would be secure. the sooner congress gets this done, the sooner our economy will get a boost. and it would then give us in washington more time to work together on that long range plan to bring down deficit
arena is so important. we saw it in new orleans after katrina. but we lost technology, we lost law and order. technology is a huge benefit of a huge risk. there are so many people who want to say kids cannot learn. some kids just cannot learn. so i would say do we really believe kids cannot learn? are there not opportunities for kids got to mark isn't our security -- for kids? when are we going to connect the dots? when are we going to break this system down and this mentality? i am excited because governor bush brings us together once a year to reflect on this and we get to hear people like you help us understand. please, help me understand. how to be connect the dots? -- how do we connect the dots? >> you are a man who did precisely that. you would not have the recovery school district, the results he had. you talk about ideas and people. asked about ideas. let me tell you, as important as ideas are, there are billions of ideas out there. in the hands of weak leaders and people who cannot execute, bad ideas and up on the cutting room floor. i have been waiting all day to say this
code book on disabilities. not going tos it's change the laws, and he is lying. host: you're talking about yesterday's debate in the senate. caller: exactly. i wish he would be as passionate about try to get people on the west coast back to work. if they would work as hard on that as the disabilities act, this country would not have the fiscal cliff because people would be working. everybody is always trying to blame the tea party. but tea party did not put this country in debt. but the party is trying to bring it to the attention of the people that these entitlements cannot be afforded any more. it is like your charge card. if you keep charging and taking and taking, pretty soon you have to pay it back. that is what is going on with this fiscal cliff. it's time to pay. it's not the republican party's fault. obama has been in office four years. he has doubled to the trillions of dollars in debt. host: are you a tea party supporter? caller: i'm not affiliated with the tea party, but i am tired of hearing them blame it, because i see the hard-working generation that are in their 60s th
to a greater extent than existed before. we have greater cooperation and coordination among all levels of law enforcement. there's a greater level of respect among the private sector parts and the public sector. but cybersecurity remains, in my judgment, the lagging indicator and the lagging response. i would hope -- i would hope that partisanship be thrown aside. i would hope that fear of the government -- although i understand that well and i have been a proponent of that of an oversized government and overly strong government, but fear of that will be tempered in the sense that we understand the threat to all of us, our standard of living in so many different ways is real and that we right now have the greatest minds working on cyber. last thought is this. if any young person is looking for a job or a career for the rest of his or her life, start training in cybersecurity. we need to do more in terms of educational program. we need to do more of training. china is training a lot more people in cybersecurity than we are. it's not because they have a larger population. it's because they're d
government rules or a law against this. i think we need more community action. host: we will stick with this conversation for another 15 minutes, but i need to give you some other news in the papers. usa today, the front-page story, looking at the housing market. and in the financial times -- overseas, here's the world section of the washington post -- this was after a report of possible poisoning reviving suspicions abound his debts. and president obama meeting yesterday with mexico's new president who will take over on saturday, meeting at the white house. try to boost relations between the detonations. and the front-page of the washington times, but it's in many of the papers this morning, angry protesters filling tahrir square in cairo. they're stepping up pressure for their president to rescind a decree that they say threaten the nation with a new era of autocracy. there's the picture on the front page of the washington times. we will be talking about this on sunday on the washington journal. back to the phone calls. john in san jose, california, independent. caller: thanks so
with at least $50 billion in the first year an increase in the debt limit that would change the law for congressional approval. we'll show you more but let's hear from you. duluth, minnesota. hello. caller: good morning. thanks for taking my call. my comment is about the fiscal cliff and social security, i don't really think that social security has really ever been a cause of the deficit. there's more funds coming in than there is funds being sent out in checks. and this whole security tax is a separate tax from the federal tax. and -- host: so this proposal includes the extension of the payroll tax cut. what do you think of that proposal? >> i think that's fine. i think extending the payroll tax is probably something we're going to have to look at doing. but when they start talking about using social security money, that botters me, because social security is never needed -- has never needed federal dollars before to fund the program. host: ok. off of twitter this is reding who says they have not offered a deficit reduction plan. republican big pledges tax reform and closing uns
talks about the role of la in china. -- rule of law in china. >> washington worked his way up. at the urging of one of his brothers he immigrated out west where the lead mine industry was in may paid a. he arrived in a ship, by stagecoach. he arrived on steamboat in this muddy town. he established a lot have been in slowly worked his way up. he became a very successful lawyer and then became involved politically. he ran for congress, search for eight terms. in any profession did abraham lincoln -- served for eight terms. as they arised, they were a close colleague during the civil war. after grant was elected president, initially appointed washburn secretary of state. at that time he became very ill. his family actually feared for his life. after about 10 days he submitted his resignation to president grant. grant accepted his resignation. over the next several months he regained his health which was always very fragile. he then offered him the position as minister of france. >> michael hill on the minister to france during the 1870 franco-prussian war. they provide political
law school. he emigrated out west to the lead minee industry was in its heyday. he arrived by stagecoach, by train and arrived in this muddy mining town, boarded himself in a log cabin and slowly worked his way up and became a successful lawyer and got involved politically, ran for congress, search for 8 terms. he then befriended abraham lincoln, obviously from illinois, and ulysses s. grant, and as they were on the rise, he stayed with them as a close confidante and colleague during the civil war. after grant was elected president, he appointed washburn secretary of state. at that time, he became ill. his family feared for his life. after 10 days, he submitted his resignation to president grants. grant regretfully accepted his resignation. over the next several months, he regained his health, which was always fragile. grant offered him the position as minister to france, ambassador to france. >> researcher and author michael hill on washburn, minister to france during the franco- prussian war. he provided political and humanitarian support. humanitarian support. "q & a," s
comments and hold town halls. it informs iacc recommendations. it is a committed group. while the law requires two meetings a year, they may need as many as 17 times a year. the law charged it with a strategic plan annually. we are drafting as always with autism committee influence an update to reflect the latest aspects in what is a research -- in autism research. over the past decade, research funding has grown substantially. investing $169 million in just the year 2011, three times more than 10 years ago. in 2009 and 2010, 120 two million dollars in an additional american recovery and investment act funds were also presented. as congress has emphasized, early diagnosis and and prevention is critical. these earliest changes ever recorded was six months and a number recent findings suggest that the factors causing it may operate very early in development. last year, researchers demonstrated that doctors often have a short questionnaire to screen inexpensive way in a child visit. another promising diagnostic tool is i gazed patterns specific to what is of -- is eye gaze patterns speci
extended all of those changes in 2010. that's the law of the land still today. tax policy has been exactly the same over this continuum. what has changed, mr. speaker, what has changed is the spending. the reason deficits have grown not one, not two, not three but almost four times larger than the previous record deficit in american history is not because tax policy has changed, it hasn't. it's because federal spending policy has changed. and that's what we have to get our arms around here in this body. what i show going forward, mr. speaker, put a little square around the annual budget deficits that have been run during the first four years of the obama administration, but i also project what the congressional budget office believes, that's a nonpartisan budget planning group we have here on capitol hill, what they believe is in store for us in the future if we continue under current policy. -h tsh-that's trillion dollar deficits going out for years to come. the problem is not tax policy, mr. speaker, the problem is spending policy. can we improve tax policy? you better believe it. mr. sp
in this country, it would be a crime and a violation of our antitrust laws. so the prescription that the energy security leadership council came up with several years ago, which was very impactful in the energy security -- independence and security act of 2007, was it? 2008? was based on our report in 2007, which said that the united states should maximize its oil and gas production, that it should significantly reduce consumption and improve conservation, which led to the direct support of the eslc for the -- from the eslc for the re-substitution of fuel efficiency standards, which had not been done for 20 years and third, to develop to the extent that it was economically viable, a biofuel substitute for petroleum. this new report that we're releasing today continues these themes with a couple of important caveats. the most important is the fantastic technical revolution that has taken place since our original report and our intermediate reports until this one today by the so-called fracking revolution for oil and gas. and at the same time the significant improvement in national efficiency tha
't afford it, and neither can our economy. the second option is better. right now, congress can pass a law that would prevent a tax hike on the first $250,000 of everybody's income. everybody. that means that 98% of americans and 97% of small businesses wouldn't see their income taxes go up at all. and even the wealthiest americans would get a tax cut on the first $250,000 of their incomes. congress can do that right now. they can give families like yours a sense of security going into the new year. they can give companies like this one some certainty about what to expect down the road. and with the issue behind us, we'll have more time to work out a plan to bring down our deficits in a balanced way -- including by asking the wealthiest americans to pay a little more, so we can still invest in the things that make our nation strong, like education and research. so let's begin by doing what we all agree on. both parties say we should keep middle-class taxes low. the senate has already passed a bill to keep income taxes from going up on middle-class families. democrats in the house are ready
in the 1990's, a law was passed by a republican congress and signed by a democratic president. what happened? welfare enrollment dropped dramatically. millions of people gained new lives of independence. poverty rates for children fell over 20% in four years. more single moms found jobs. your welfare checks going out and more money for states to spend on child care so more moms could go to work and support themselves. welfare reform worked because it encouraged the best in people. it appealed to their desire to shape their own destiny. it helped get government out of the business of fostering dependency. here is the problem. we have not applied a waltham -- a welfare reform mindset with equal vigor across programs. in most cases, we are still trying to measure compassion by how much spend cannot how many we help. last year, spending on programs came over $1 trillion. what does that mean in practical terms? for that amount of money, you could give every single poor american a check for $22,000. instead, we just spent all of that money trying to fight poverty from government programs. now, wha
's health care law and how that can impact the possibility of -- [inaudible] being on the table during this discussion? >> no specific discussion of -- there was no specific discussion of how the health -- the new health plan will affect medicare or will affect the economy. there's no specific discussion on that. there wasn't any lengthy discussion on the establishment of the exchanges. the focus was on what has just been reported. and that is that the states are willing to share the sacrifice. we don't want to take it all. but we're willing to do our part. we don't need shifting. we don't need cuts on the federal level that merely require tax increases on the state level. and so there was the unity by all of these governors and by our efforts not as has been pointed out, to get too specific on any one area but to offer our willingness to go forward and aid and assist with thoughts, ideas and suggestions. but there wasn't a detail-specific discussion about federal health care and the impact that it would have on medicare cuts or the impact that it would have on the economy in general.
can pass a law that would prevent a tax hike on the first $250,000 of everybody's income. everybody's. that means that 98% of americans and 97% of small businesses wouldn't see their income taxes go up by a single dime. 98% of americans, 97% of small businesses wouldn't see their taxes go up by a single dime. even the wealthiest americans would still get a tax cut on the first $250,000 of their income. so it's not like folks who make more than $250,000 aren't getting a tax break too. they're getting a tax break on the first $250,000 like everybody else. families and small businesses would therefore be able to enjoy some peace of mindheading into christmas and heading into the new year. and it would give us more time than next year to work together -- more time, then, next year, to work together ton ona plan to bring down deficit, streamline the tax system, and to do it in a balanced way, including asking the wealthiest americans to pay late more so we can still invest in things like education and training and science and research. now i know some of this may sound familiar to you be
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